Farmers prepare for an uncertain year during shutdown

The winter season is not time off for farmers. Instead, they spend their time during the non-growing season preparing for the next year.

Posted: Jan 15, 2019 5:23 PM

(ST. JOSEPH, Mo.) The winter season is not time off for farmers. Instead, they spend their time during the non-growing season preparing for the next year.

As snow covers the ground, farmers are looking ahead to the warm months of summer for growing season. Including ordering seed and fertilizer but one thing farmers may also choose to do is apply for loans and during the government shutdown, this poses problems.

Limited services coming from the United States Department of Agriculture and county Farm Service Agencies prevent farmers from applying for these loans and this is leading to more uncertainty.

Also, to some extent, the federal employees out of work and without pay, may have an impact on the demand for goods that farmers produce.

"Those people who are not getting paychecks aren't going to the store and buying t-bone steaks. Their not buying high end foods, the high proteins, and things like that," Tim Gach, Vice President of the Buchanan County Farm Bureau said. "Their trying to make do with the stuff they got, understandably so. And that in turn, effects the agricultural community because we are the one's who produce that food."

This government shutdown is the longest in United States history.

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